Jamaica Dominated And ended Carifta with 77 medals

Jamaica once again underlined its dominance of regional track and field, emphatically topping the competition at the 41st Carifta Games, which came to a close at the National Sports  Centre in Bermuda yesterday. The Jamaicans ended the championships with a massive 77 medals – 34 gold, 24 silver and 19 bronze medals – with The Bahamas running second best with 38 medals (13 gold, 13 silver, 12 bronze) and Trinidad and Tobago’s 24 medals (eight gold, nine silver, seven bronze) rounding out the top three. This was one of the island’s best ever showings at the Carifta Games, with the record 84-medal haul in 2004 falling out of reach this time around. Jamaica have now won the championship on 36 of 41 occasions and have won every instalment since 1985. Defending champion Ashinia Miller once again walked away with the under-20 boys’ shot put title, winning in 18.96m ahead of teammate Emmanuel Onyia, who registered an 18.89m mark in his first outing for Jamaica. It was also one-two for the Jamaicans in the under-17 110m hurdles final, Jaheel Hyde dipping in time to get the better of compatriot Michael O’Hara. Hyde crossed the line in 13.96, with O’Hara close behind in 13.97. Jamaica secured two more medal spots in the girls’ 3000m open, as Alethia McLaughlin was first across the line in 10:16.80, while teammate Marleena Eubanks, 10:29.67, was third behind silver medallist Taylor-Ashley Bean, 10:22.82, from Bermuda. The Jamaicans did not ease their medal assault throughout the day, winning three of the four 4x400m relays contested; the under-17 boys taking the spotlight with a record, 3:13.01-run in their final, smashing the old mark of 3:15.09, which was set by Trinidad and Tobago in 2002. The under-17 girls’ final was won with a 3:44.64 clocking ahead of The Bahamas, 3:51.45 and Barbados ending third in 3:56.87. Jamaica claimed their third consecutive mile-relay gold medal in the under-20 girls’ 4x400m relay final. Powerful second-leg run A powerful second-leg run by double gold medallist, Simoya Campbell, and an even better third leg effort by Janieve Russell, set up a massive win for the Jamaicans, with their 3:34.27 clocking proving too quick for The Bahamas, 3:40.44 and Barbados, 3:50.54. Jamaica, however, had to settle for third place in the under-20 boys’ final in 3:12.48 behind Trinidad and Tobago, 3:11.62 and The Bahamas – next year’s hosts bringing down the curtains in 3:09.23. Earlier, in the under-20 final, Stefan Fennell, 13.66, and Yannick Hart, 13.88, finished in the silver and bronze medal positions, respectively, as Guadeloupe’s Wilhem Belocian took top honours in 13.63. Yanique Thompson was the only athlete to stop the clock in under 14 seconds, winning the under-17 girls 100m hurdles in 13.67.



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